8th Annual Lewes Creative Writers' Conference

 

The 8th Annual Lewes Creative Writers’ Conference

Saturday, August 22, 2015
at the
Lewes Public Library

Sponsored by:

The Lewes Public Library, The National League of American Pen Women, Diamond State Branch, The Delaware Division of Libraries, The Delaware Division of the Arts, and The Rehoboth Beach Writers Guild.

This conference is FREE, but if you would like to make a donation to help defray conference expenses, click on the "Donate Now" button below and type "Conference" in the designation block. Thank You!

 

On Friday August 21, 2015 from 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM

we will present readings by Delaware Division of the Arts Fellowship Recipients.
Click here for more information and to register for this free event.

 

Due to the large number of registrations for this conference, registration is now closed. To be added to a wait list for this year's conference and to the list to be notified for next year's conference, please email kristen.gramer@lib.de.us.

Workshop Presenter Biographies

Schedule

8:00 - 8:30 AM: Registration/Refreshments (Room 1)

8:30 - 8:55 AM: General Remarks by Ed Goyda and Billie Travalini (Room 1)

9:00 – 10:30 AM: Session I - Select One

A. How Not To Bore Your Reader: The Role of Point of View in Fiction & Creative Nonfiction/Memoir
Maribeth Fischer (Room 1)

"A part from the use of significant detail, there is no more important skill for a writer to grasp than this, the control of point of view. These two are, as Carol Bly says in The Passionate Accurate Story, “the two literary abilities that divide master from apprentice.”          Janet Burroway, Writing Fiction
  
When people discuss Point of View (POV), they often, mistakenly, think POV is just a matter of choosing between first, second, and third person. In part, because of this misperception, POV is rarely discussed in nonfiction classes (where it is assumed there is no need to discuss it, for isn't nonfiction usually written in singular first person?). Also because of this misperception, POV remains an area where even seasoned, professional writers struggle to capture the reader's attention.

B. Poetry: Throwing Your Voice by Expressing Yourself through Personae
Dora Malech (Room 2)

Writing poetry from a perspective other than your own can be liberating -- and it can also allow you to say things in poetry that you might not have been able to articulate through a more direct approach. In this session we will experiment with literary masks and personae, drawing inspiration from the work of such established poets as W.B. Yeats, Edna St. Vincent Millay, Randall Jarrell, Gwendolyn Brooks, Louise Glück, and Les Murray. Be ready for fearless experimentation!

C. Flash Fiction
Ethan Joella (Delaware Room)

Shorter fiction is in high demand from literary journals. One writer describes flash fiction as writing "with its teeth bared and its claws extended." In this session, you may submit a piece of flash fiction you're working on (under 2-pages in length); or, if you haven't written flash fiction, an excerpt, scene, or dialogue exchange. We will discuss how flash fiction happens suddenly, often sacrificing one or more of a story's elements; and, we will discuss how many stories exist within other larger stories.  To begin, submit a story under 2-pages or a brief excerpt, scene, or dialogue (not more than 1-page), by July 15 to  ethanjoella@yahoo.com    Notification of acceptance into the workshop will arrive via email August 1, or before. If accepted, you will be asked to email your excerpt, scene, or dialogue to fellow participants for comments that point to revision and, ultimately, publication.

*  Workshop is ideal for both prose writers and poets. Limited to eight participants

10:40 AM – 12:10 PM: Session II - Select One

A. Finding the Story in True Events: Creative Nonfiction
Kathryn Craft (Room 1)

In fiction, writers seek the truth in imagined story; in creative nonfiction, writers seek the story in true events. In this session we will take a fresh look at story elements that can make your nonfiction read like a novel, and how popular writers of creative nonfiction hook the reader with the same kind of entertaining, important-seeming, and heart-warming material that makes all stories linger in the mind long after the book is closed.

B. Writing Grief, Bearing Witness
Heather Thomas (Room 2)

Writing poems through loss and grief is a way of standing by ourselves and bearing witness. Here, we are asked to make something of loss. Working with the materials of grief, we will name, inquire, compose, and make form on the page what is found. Poets from Rilke to Rumi, H.D. to Brenda Hillman, will guide us. In the process we may ignore preconceived notions like “letting go,” and revise our lives from pain into possibility. After all, “the dead do not want us dead,” Jane Hirshfield wrote: “such petty errors are left for the living.”

C. Poetry Writing
Dora Malech (Delaware Room)

This will be run as a workshop in which we read and comment on the poetry of workshop participants.  Prospective participants are asked to submit two poems by July 15 to dmalech1@jhu.edu Notification of acceptance into the workshop will arrive via email August 1, or before. If accepted, participants will be asked to email one of their poems to fellow workshop members for comments that point to revision and, ultimately, publication.

 *  Workshop is limited to eight participants

12:20 - 1:40 PM: Lunchtime - See Registration Form for lunchtime options

Book Sales & Signings

Handouts from Sponsor Organizations

Handouts and Information from The Broadkill Review, Beltway Poetry Quarterly, Broken Turtle, Cat & Mouse Press, Delaware Beach Life, The National League of American Pen Women, Diamond State Branch, The Rehoboth Beach Writers’ Guild, plus more.

A. Round Table Discussion: Getting Published
(Room 1)

Linda Blaskey, The Broadkill Review, The Broadkill River Press, and Dogfish Head Poetry Prize; Nancy Sakaduski, Cat & Mouse Press; Phil Bannowsky, Broken Turtle Press and Dreamstreets;  and, Cecilia Galante, author.

Two of Delaware’s leading independent publishers, a local book promoter and blogger, and a best-selling author under contact with Random House, will take part in a roundtable discussion about what to do to get published (and, what you should never do). After the discussion there will be time for questions from the audience.

B. Delaware Division of the Arts (DDOA): Fellowship Grants plus Artists' Roster & Arts Roster
(Room 2)

Roxanne Stanulis, Program Officer, Artist Services Coordinator, Marketing, Grantee Liaison, DDOA

Part 1: Grants & Opportunities for Artists: Step by Step

The DDOA is the one-stop resource for information about funding opportunities available to help Delaware writers create, share, and grow. In this short session you will learn what services are available to writers, including who’s eligible and what’s involved in the application process. All services are free. Learn how much the DDOA has to offer you and how easy it is to participate.

Part 2: The Arts Roster: What it is & What it Can Do For You!

Here, the focus is on what writers need to know about the Delaware Arts Roster and what the Arts Roster can do to get your work in the public eye, increase sales, and open up opportunities for readings, lectures, and more. 

1:50 – 3:30 p.m.: Session III – Select One

A. Novel Writing
Cecilia Galante (Room 1)

The idea of beginning a novel is both exhilarating and intimidating. This class deconstructs the craft basics of plot and structure, description, character, dialogue, creating conflict, and more to better tell the story that's burning within. Whether you're contemplating what to write about, or have begun your first draft, this is an excellent choice for any writer confronting the challenge of a longer work.

B. Story Shrink: Writing the Synopsis and Pitch
Kathryn Craft (Room 2)

You've spent a year or more adding words until you've completed a novel-length project only to find that now, to market it, you must shrink it back down. We will discuss the novel synopsis with an eye towards why agents and editors put you through this agonizing exercise; then we will look at how you can shrink your synopsis even further into a manageable pitch.

C. Poetry Writing
Heather Thomas (Delaware Room)

This will be run as a workshop in which we read and comment on the poetry of workshop participants.  Prospective participants are asked to submit two poems by July 15 heatherhthomas@gmail.com Notification of acceptance into the workshop will arrive via email August 1, or before. If accepted, participants will be asked to email one of their poems to fellow workshop members for comments that point to revision and, ultimately, publication.

 *  Workshop is limited to eight participants

This program is made possible, in part, by a grant from the Delaware Division of the Arts, a state agency dedicated to nurturing and supporting the arts in Delaware, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts.

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